Supreme Anniversary 2160 RTR – Caravan Review

Article by · May 27, 2017 ·

The ultimate birthday gift

 Supreme comes to the 30th party with a heap of extras

By Rod Bruem

It’s fairly common practice these days for kids to go to a birthday party and leave with a “gift bag” of their own. Isn’t it about time this rule applied in business too?

Supreme has certainly been in a gift-giving party mood as the Prosenik brothers clocked up 30 years of manufacturing. For new caravan buyers in the market right now, there are heaps of extra goodies to take home.

The Anniversary range has four different layouts, starting with a single axle 18ft model and going up to a 22ft van with a rear club lounge.

The headline extras thrown in include upgraded windows, solar systems, kitchen bench tops and splash backs, high-end upholstered lounges, large front-load washing machines, a generator hatch and a whopping big upfront tunnel boot to boot.

On our our 21ft 6in test model, the tunnel boot was fitted out with a slide-out stainless steel outdoor kitchen including sink, stove and an esky-size fridge. There’s also a full-length electric awning. Pretty impressive -and wait till I tell you the price.

First, how does it look?

From the outside, this is a striking good looker. Supreme has moved to a tough new exterior cladding called “alcubond”. The grey matt finish topped off with black decals and 800m high black checkerplate certainly turned plenty of heads on our test drive.

Looks a bit tough from the outside, but a smooth interior. It’s very comfortable and at night it lights up like a Christmas tree.  There are 14 LED ceiling lights in the main cabin, two more in the bathroom.

Stepping inside, the layout of this model has a galley-style kitchen area on your left hand side, lounge and island table directly across from that.

_DSC2678The kitchen is stylishly finished and well equipped with a full-sized sink, oven with griller and four hotplates – one electric, three gas. The exhaust fan above is externally vented.

Up the front of the van is the amazing bed. It’s a full queen-size and there’s plenty of room to move around it on all sides.  Find the right spot and you could kick back and relax on this bed for way too many hours, taking in the views from two large Ranger brand three-way windows on either side and a roof hatch above to keep it airy. While the windows have built in screens, Supreme has finished them off with pelmets and rubber backed-drapes. Looks classy, although I would probably take down the one immediately above the sink and stove.

Underneath the bed is a good storage space, access made easy thanks to gas struts.

Storage is the other big stand-out feature of the van. In the kitchen area alone there are nine slide-out drawers –actually 11 if you count two big drawers underneath the lounge. There are three pull-out pantry rack spaces. There are 10 gas-assisted lift up hatch cupboards around the ceiling height on all three sides of the main room. (One hides the stereo unit) Another four big handy cupboards just on your right hand side as you enter the van. I could keep going, but you get the idea. Plenty of spaces to lose things is the only downside – that and the fact there is a rather standard (small) space for hanging clothes on each side of the bed – I’d like a bit more, but that’s being really picky.

The bathroom

Rear-end ensuites are de rigueur in caravans these days and often critical in shaping buyer’s decisions. Supreme does an exceptional job with its design and focus on the detail. Again, lots of good storage spaces. The cupboards around the basin are slim, leaving more room to move. There’s a good-sized shower, with lockable door for when you’re on the road. The washing machine is right next to the toilet, so you can sit a clothes basket on the toilet lid as you load and unload. Above the washing machine is another good-sized cupboard for towels and linen. The bathroom is screened from the main part of the fan with a stylish Perspex sliding door. It’s sturdy, but allows in plenty of light.

For the full review and specs, see Issue 23 of ROAM


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